Texas Butterflies: Pictures and Butterfly Identification Help

Shares 0

picture of a Monarch Butterfly on Milkweed, part of the Texas Butterflies collection

Texas butterfies, it’s a topic that not only could fill books, but also it literally does fill books.

The state tops the list of states in butterfly diversity, with well over half of all the United States butterflies found in the state. According to the North American Butterfly Association (NABA), three counties in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Cameron, Hidalgo and Starr, host approximately three hundred of Texas’ approximately four hundred and fifty butterfly species.

Most of Texas north of the area also promotes butterfly diversity, with butterfly garden tips, and butterfly checklists available in most cities.

Tourists can literally find butterflies in Texas throughout the year, so there’s never an excuse to be bored. Get the camera out and start snapping pictures and telling your stories about Texas butterflies on Gratography today.

The top picture shows a Monarch Butterfly, the official Texas State insect.

Butterfly identification usually begins with color. The Texas butterfly section divides into nine categories based on wing color and/or the butterfly family.

The eventual goal is to build a resource to help all visitors and members with their identification questions. In the mean time, visitors with immediate butterfly identification questions can press the green butterfly button for more information.

Butterflies: Whites and Yellows


picture of a Giant White butterfly
Texas butterflies diversity starts with the family Pieridae. Most people know them as the butterflies with white wings and yellow wings. Most states have more of the yellow butterfly species. Texas has a nice balance.

The picture shows a Giant White. The list of Pieridae follows.

Whites
Costa-spotted Mimic-White
Desert Orangetip
Southwestern Orangetip
Falcate Orangetip
Olympia Marble
Desert Marble
Florida White
Common Melwhite
Pine White
Mexican Dartwhite
Viardi White
Cross-barred White
Mountain White
Cabbage White
Checkered White
Spring White
Great Southern White
Giant White
Yellows
Clouded Sulphur
Orange Sulphur
Southern Dogface
Yellow Angled-Sulphur
White Angled-Sulphur
Cloudless Sulphur
Large Orange Sulphur
Orange-barred Sulphur
Tailed Sulphur
Statira Sulphur
Lyside Sulphur
Barred Yellow
Boisduval’s Yellow
Mexican Yellow
Salome Yellow
Ghost Yellow
Tailed Orange
Little Yellow
Mimosa Yellow
Dina Yellow
Sleepy Orange
Dainty Sulphur

Blues, Hairtreaks and Coppers


picture of an Arizona hairstreak
Copper butterflies are most prominent along the West Coast, so that’s about the only category of butterflies the state lacks. The large number of Hairstreaks, including ministreaks and groundstreaks more than makes up for it.

The picture shows an Arizona Hairstreak.

Blues
Cassius Blue
Marine Blue
Cyna Blue
Western Pygmy-Blue
Eastern Pygmy-Blue
Eastern Tailed-Blue
Spring Azure
Summer Azure
Silvery Blue
Rita Dotted-Blue
Ceraunus Blue
Reakirt’s Blue
Melissa Blue
Acmon Blue
Lupine Blue
Hairstreaks
Colorado Hairstreak
Mexican Cycadian
Great Purple Hairstreak
Juniper Hairstreak
Olive’ Juniper Hairstreak
Thicket Hairstreak
Xami Hairstreak
Sandia Hairstreak
Frosted Elfin
Henry’s Elfin
Eastern Pine Elfin
Goodson’s Greenstreak
Tropical Greenstreak
Clench’s Greenstreak
Gold-bordered Hairstreak
Marius Hairstreak
Sky-blue Groundstreak
Oak Hairstreak
Northern’ Southern Hairstreak
Poling’s Hairstreak
Coral Hairstreak
Edwards’ Hairstreak
Banded Hairstreak
King’s Hairstreak
Striped Hairstreak
Behr’s Hairstreak
Soapberry Hairstreak
Black Hairstreak
Silver-banded Hairstreak
Telea Hairstreak
Strophius Hairstreak
Orange-crescent Groundstreak
Ruddy Hairstreak
Muted Hairstreak
Red-banded Hairstreak
Dusky-blue Groundstreak
Gray Hairstreak
Red-crescent Scrub-Hairstreak
White Scrub-Hairstreak
Lacey’s Scrub-Hairstreak
Red-lined Scrub-Hairstreak
Yojoa Scrub-Hairstreak
Tailless Scrub-Hairstreak
Mallow Scrub-Hairstreak
Lantana Scrub-Hairstreak
Bromeliad Scrub-Hairstreak
Big Bend Scrub-Hairstreak
Megarus Scrub-Hairstreak
Red-spotted Hairstreak
Leda Ministreak
Clytie Ministreak
Gray Ministreak
Pearly-gray Hairstreak
Zebra-striped Hairstreak
Aquamarine Hairstreak
White-M Hairstreak
Arizona Hairstreak
Coppers
Harvester
Gray Copper

Brush Footed Butterflies


picture of an Empress Leilia butterfly
The presence of a large number of tropical butterflies explains the large number of Brush Footed butterflies in Texas.

The picture shows an Empress Leila. Texas covers all the so called Royalty butterflies, with Emperors, Empress, Monarchs and Queens.

Brush footed
American Snout
Monarch
Queen
Soldier
Tiger Mimic-Queen
Klug’s Clearwing
Cotytto Clearwing
Mexican Silverspot
Gulf Fritillary
Julia Heliconian
Banded Orange Heliconian
Isabella’s Heliconian
Zebra Heliconian
Erato Heliconian
Variegated Fritillary
Mexican Fritillary
Great Spangled Fritillary
Tailed Cecropian
Blomfild’s Beauty
Red-spotted Purple
Astyanax’ Red-spotted Purple
Viceroy
Weidemeyer’s Admiral
Arizona Sister
California Sister
Band-celled Sister
Spot-celled Sister
Many-banded Daggerwing
Ruddy Daggerwing
Waiter Daggerwing
Hackberry Emperor
Empress Leilia
Tawny Emperor
Pavon Emperor
Silver Emperor
Red Rim
Common Mestra
Florida Purplewing
Dingy Purplewing
Blackened Bluewing
Mexican Bluewing
Gray Cracker
Glaucous Cracker
Variable Cracker
Guatemalan Cracker
Brownish Cracker
Orange Cracker
Red Cracker
Common Banner
Orange Banner
Tithian Sailor
Mexican Sailor
Blue-eyed Sailor
Anna’s Eighty-eight
Mexican Eighty-eight
Dotted Checkerspot
Brush footed
Crimson Patch
Definite Patch
Eumeda (Medial) Patch
Red-spotted Patch
Banded Patch
Rosita Patch
Theona Checkerspot
Fulvia Checkerspot
Silvery Checkerspot
Gorgone Checkerspot
Bordered Patch
Sagebrush Checkerspot
Elf
Tiny Checkerspot
Elada Checkerspot
Vesta or Graphic
Painted Crescent
Mylitta Crescent
Phaon Crescent
Mexican Crescent
Pearl Crescent
Tulcis Crescent
Texan Crescent
Black Crescent
Chestnut Crescent
Baltimore Checkerspot
Mimic
Common Buckeye
Tropical Buckeye
White Peacock
Banded Peacock
Malachite
Rusty-tipped Page
Question Mark
Eastern Comma
Mourning Cloak
Red Admiral
Painted Lady
West Coast Lady
American Lady
Tropical Leafwing
Goatweed Leafwing
Angled Leafwing
Chestnut Leafwing
Pale-spotted Leafwing
Forrer’s Leafwing
One-spotted Prepona
Southern Pearly-eye
Northern Pearly-eye
Creole Pearly-eye
Gemmed Satyr
Canyonland Satyr
Georgia Satyr
Little Wood-Satyr
Viola’s Wood-Satyr
Red Satyr
Carolina Satyr
Common Wood-Nymph
Mead’s Wood-Nymph
Red-bordered Satyr

Texas Butterflies: Swallowtails


picture of a Polydamus Swallowtail butterfly
Swallowtails
Pipevine Swallowtail
Polydamas Swallowtail
Dark Kite-Swallowtail
Zebra Swallowtail
Variable Swallowtail
Black Swallowtail
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
Western Tiger Swallowtail
Two-tailed Swallowtail
Three-tailed Swallowtail
Swallowtails
Spicebush Swallowtail
Palamedes Swallowtail
Magnificent Swallowtail
Victorine Swallowtail
Thoas Swallowtail
Giant Swallowtail
Broad-banded Swallowtail
Ornythion Swallowtail
Ruby-spotted Swallowtail
Pink-spotted Swallowtail

Butterflies: Metalmarks


picture of a Zela Metalmark butterfly
Metalmark butterflies are most diverse in the tropical areas of the Americas. That explains the unusually high number of Texas metalmarks. Some expecially colorful species such as Pixies and Blue Metalmarks can be seen in South Texas.
  • Little Metalmark
  • Fatal Metalmark
  • Rounded Metalmark
  • Rawson’s Metalmark
  • Red-bordered Metalmark
  • Blue Metalmark
  • Red-bordered Pixie
  • Zela Metalmark
  • Curve-winged Metalmark
  • Falcate Metalmark
  • Mormon Metalmark
  • Mexican Metalmark
  • Sonoran Metalmark
  • Palmer’s Metalmark
  • Hepburn’s Metalmark
  • Walker’s Metalmark
  • Narrow-winged Metalmark
  • Chisos Metalmark